Annie Noble Image 07

Published: October 20, 2023

Last Updated: October 19, 2023

Get To Know Fashion Photographer Annie Noble

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Annie Noble Image 07

London-based fashion photographer and art director Annie Noble has a rich connection to the world of creativity and fashion. Her work is characterized by explorations of color, motion, and expression, with a strong emphasis on dynamic storytelling and diverse casting.

Speaking of her unexpected path into fashion, Annie explains, “My grandma was a talented dressmaker in the 80s and started her own company making bespoke garments. Completely unplanned, my path now feels like a homage to the strong women in my life and an expression of fashion in my own way.”

But what truly sets Annie apart is her connection to her subjects. Her approach to portraiture goes beyond mere aesthetics, delving into the very soul of the people she photographs. As she eloquently puts it, “For me, taking a portrait is all about focusing on the finer details, the softness in someone’s features, raw emotion, and the way they hold themselves.”

This connection to her subjects isn’t an accident; it’s a reflection of her own history and her passion for storytelling. Annie’s love for fashion photography is deeply rooted in her family, with influences ranging from her grandmas’ love for clothes to her own adventurous experiments. “Completely unplanned, my path now feels like a homage to the strong women in my life and an expression of fashion in my own way,” she reveals.

For a deeper dive into her artistic world and the chance to unravel her inspirations and the tales she weaves with her camera, check out our comprehensive interview with Annie Noble below.

Can you tell us a bit more about yourself?

My name is Annie, and I’m a London-based fashion photographer and art director. From a very young age, I found myself gravitating toward creativity rather than academia, choosing to study fine art through school into higher education. I discovered a love in particular for portraiture, faces, and features, experimenting with mixed media, and combining photographic prints and painting, which is where my passion for capturing stills began. 

How did you initially get involved in photography as a career? 

From then on, it was all about narrative and storytelling for me, from taking images of the world around me to snaps of friends and nature. I once wrapped a poor friend of mine in clingfilm and photographed her in the depths of winter against the backdrop of a misty lake for an experimental — and quite obscure — project inspired by the work of artists Christo and Jeanne-Claudez!

Plenty of interesting projects have happened since, but I now understand it as a fascination in capturing people, depicting their characters, and shaping their personalities with light expression – telling their stories through the lens. 

London is a multicultural hub for all things culture and fashion—did your upbringing in the city influence the way you view the world or your craft in particular? 

I was originally born in South West London but moved to Oxfordshire at a young age. I ended up returning to London in my early twenties to pursue a career in photography and art direction. 

I think I have mostly been influenced by nature and softness, juxtaposed with colors, angles, and character, which feels like a natural blend of both my Oxfordshire and London upbringing. I feel just as inspired by striking cityscapes and architecture as I do beautiful country landscapes. I’ve always viewed London as an amazing place full of culture, diversity, and opportunity, and it’s definitely shaped my photography style over the years.

I recently shot an editorial based on London and a young woman exploring the vibrant city streets she calls home, capturing the environment around her.

Having worked with several design houses and brands, can you tell us a bit more about what drew you to fashion in particular? 

My grandma was a talented dressmaker in the 80s and started her own company making bespoke garments and selling them through department stores such as Liberty’s. My other grandma is a larger-than-life character with an infectious zest for art and culture. Her and my grandpa were keen travelers, often bringing home intricate trinkets and unique garments she had acquired from across the globe for us to dress up in.

My mum pursued a career in medicine but has a real love for fashion and is one of the most stylish women I know. We often spent Saturdays trawling around the shops looking through catalogs and the latest collections. A creative eye and love for clothes is something that has always been in my genes. 

Throughout my early years of studying photography, I was often steered towards taking images of beautiful landscapes, urban architecture and still life. This was a great starting point for technical skills, but for me, the real excitement came when photographing people and building concepts around clothes, color, and character. Completely unplanned, my path now feels like a homage to the strong women in my life and an expression of fashion in my own way. 

Portraiture is obviously a really big part of your work. What compels you to work with certain subjects and environments? 

For me, taking a portrait is all about focusing on the finer details, the softness in someone’s features, raw emotion, and the way they hold themselves. I find that experimenting with expression whilst using both light and motion to help capture a person’s character whilst portraying a narrative and more intimate story through the image.

For those unfamiliar, how would you describe the current aesthetic that you aim for in your work? 

My work is typically characterized by explorations of femininity, color, motion, and expression, with a focus on diverse casting and storytelling. I shoot in both film and digital. I love the softness, creaminess, and rich color that film brings combined with digital that brings a more dynamic element to my work. Color is such a big thing for me and my work, unexpected color combinations, clashing prints, and textures. My phone is full of snapshots of things I have seen out and about that spark ideas and emotion. 

I like to be experimental with the way I light my work. I often find myself switching between very soft, subtle, and diffused lighting when working on projects with a heavy and raw narrative and more candid in-the-moment aesthetic as well as using more premium moody tones or punchy setups and light shaping for more dynamic fashion-led stories. Set and location also play a big part in the way I work. I often build concepts and ideas from either a setting or an initial set idea.

I start off by playing with color combinations, print, patterns, and layering textural elements alongside the fashion, and it stems from there. This process always helps me shape a narrative and concept and ties the whole story together.