LYNZI

LYNZI Wants To Redefine Womenswear

The rise of Black-owned independent fashion labels has been an amazing movement to watch, and womenswear brands like LYNZI are transcending into popularity for their unique and bold designs. Founded in 2014 by Lindsay Jenkins, the label was made for style-conscious women who want to feel feminine with a masculine undertone. Since then, the brand has continued its expansion with several stylish dresses, bikinis, trousers, and much more.

For Lindsay Jenkins, clothing and style were simply something she was born into with her mother and grandmothers previously having experience as seamstresses and fashion designers. The Detroit-native found herself creating dresses in a school of creative studies for a final project and the outcome—two dresses—sparked a creative fire in her to create a brand out of it. LYNZI embodies everything you look for in women’s clothing, delivering high-quality, detailed, and stylish designs that ladies alike can feel sexy and confident in.

We had the pleasure of chatting with Lindsay in regards to launching her womenswear label LYNZI, her Detroit upbringing, and dream muses amongst other things! Check it out below.

What led you to launch LYNZI? How does it reflect your personal style and aesthetic?

I started Lynzi because I’ve always loved fashion. I’ve always been a very expressive and creative person, and I felt that fashion and art were the best avenues for me to creatively express myself in a healthy and passionate way. I feel that fashion is ingrained in me, as I’m a 4th generation fashion designer in my family. Lynzi is a direct reflection of how I feel about myself – my much cooler alter ego if you will. She’s who I want to show up as – the feminine and sexy badass

Obviously being from Detroit, what role did the city have on you personally and career-wise?

Detroit is a city of hustlers; we really have to grind and get it out of the mud — literally. Everybody around me has their own individual hustle going on. Making a way for myself in Detroit, I developed grit, determination, and a hustle that’s unique to our city. Growing up, I had several jobs and internships working with a few of the influential fashion designers in my city alongside a few other high-end brands. One of the most recent was a high-end concept store in downtown Detroit called Detroit is the New Black, where I refined my style as a fashion professional and learned how to run a business by working directly under pioneers in the fashion industry.

As a designer, how do you want people to feel when they put on your pieces?

As a designer, I want women to feel sexy, confident, feminine, and slightly badass when they wear my designs. I want them to feel supreme.

What celebrities and muses do you dream of seeing your pieces on and why?

Some celebrities I’d like to see in Lynzi are Zoe Kravitz, Zendaya, Coi Leray, Dess Dior, or Rihanna. I see them in my clothes because I believe Lynzi’s mission is to showcase women who are feminine with a hint of edginess, and I believe those women effortlessly represent that style. For example, Rihanna is a feminine womanly woman, but she also has an edge and sex appeal to her which makes her appear to be more multidimensional. That vibe is the exact type of woman that I’d like to style.

Apart from working on new capsules, what are some things that have been keeping you motivated?

The thing that keeps me motivated is that this is my livelihood. It feels like I’m at a phase of my career where I get to reap the benefits of all the effort and persistence that I put in over the years; it’s the fact that it’s starting to feel right and purposeful. Fashion is my outlet for creativity, so it doesn’t always feel like work. I love being able to travel and meet new people within my career. I go to it when I’m happy, upset, bored, etc. Although it can be overwhelming at times, it’s fulfilling.

How have you seen the Black fashion scene evolve over the past few years and are there any changes you hope to see?

Over the past few years, I’ve seen so many black-owned brands become mainstream. There are brands like Telfar, Brandon Blackwood, Brother Vellies, Fenty, Pyer Moss, and Laquan Smith who have evolved not only as black fashion designers but as prominent and renowned fashion designers period in this industry. Seeing that as a young black fashion designer is inspiring. The only change I wish to see is to see less fast fashion and more black-owned products – it’s a much better investment.

What’s your most treasured LYNZI item in your wardrobe? Is there a story behind it?

My most treasured Lynzi item would probably have to be a denim patchwork bolero that I made 3 years ago. I made it out of several thrifted pairs of jeans. I cut up the jeans, cut them into little squares, sewed them together, and made different clothes out of them. There’s no significant story behind it other than it being very intricate and time-consuming to make. It was also one of my more popular pieces back at the time, and I remember thinking that I could really do this as a career. On top of that, I lowkey think that piece in particular is still kind of cool and timeless with it being denim and whatnot.

In regards to the future, what’s next for the fashion label?

What’s next for Lynzi is a plethora of things. I just want to keep expanding and expressing myself through the domain of fashion by doing fashion shows, networking with different buyers to see where I can place products, pop-up shops in different cities, and maybe even opening a flagship store. I want Lynzi to also be known for its philanthropic efforts to educate and connect with the youth in my community whether it be a talk, teaching a class, or an internship opportunity. All in all, I just want to focus on expanding and getting my brand in front of and on the right people.

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